Curriculum Detail - English

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Year 7

Year 7 is doing a Holiday Unit focusing on reading and writing skills. This is followed by a unit on Gothic Horror, introducing elements of the Gothic genre and assessing reading and writing non- fiction skills.

Year 7 will be studying a Myths and Legends unit. They will read a number of short stories and explore the context in which these stories are written. They will evaluate how effectively a writer uses language and write their own quest narrative. The aim is to build on our students’ Cultural Capital and create a foundation of knowledge to assist with future literary studies. Our students will then go on to study Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream where they will be required to build on their understanding of his plays, developing any knowledge they have acquired at KS2. As part of our Interleave Curriculum, students will be exposed to a variety of English Language and English Literature skills through all units of work.

Year 7 will be exploring short stories in the first half of the Summer term, examining the writers’ craft and attempting to use some of the skills that they discover in their own writing. As in previous terms, our Interleave Curriculum will ensure that our students do not forget about the skills they have already developed but instead continue to reflect upon their reading and writing skills and constantly strive to progress. Students will then be introduced to moving image and will use a short film to inspire them to write a narrative. This will also enable students to be introduced to Film Studies, a subject that they may wish to pursue in their future studies. The final few weeks of term will be used to revise and develop key skills before sitting an end of year assessment.

Year 8

Year 8 is doing a War unit based on Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo. They will be assessed for reading and writing skills. They then move onto Romeo and Juliet to help prepare them for Shakespeare at Key Stage 4.

Year 8 will be studying Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. This is a nine week unit to allow students the time to read the whole text and to analyse Shakespeare’s language. As part of our Interleave Curriculum, various skills from both English disciplines – Language and Literature – will be woven throughout the scheme. We also aim to bring relevance to Shakespeare’s work by relating it the world and society that our students belong to. With this in mind, we will take themes such as gang violence and knife crimes from Romeo and Juliet and ask our students to reflect on these themes and the world we live in today. This will then form a basis for a Spoken Language assessment and give our students the opportunity to develop their oracy. In the second part of the term, our students will explore a variety of different cultures and traditions through the rich world of poetry and we will actively encourage students to share their own cultures and traditions with us. As with previous units of work, we will be constantly re-visiting reading and writing skills.

Year 8 - students will study a novel – either Holes or Roll of Thunder – as part of their seminal studies, building on the themes of diversity, inequality and cultural context that they explored during the poetry from other cultures unit of work. They will be encouraged to reflect upon their prior learning and so become active learners. As with all other schemes of work, students will re-visit reading and writing skills. During the second half of the Summer term, Year 8 students will complete a ‘Murder Mystery’ unit of work where they will be encouraged to investigate key tropes of the genre.

Year 9

Year 9 (Exam Board AQA) will be completing a scheme of work based around the novella Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Reading and writing skills will be assessed. They will then move onto a scheme that will explore poetry from the GCSE Anthology in preparation, and as an introduction to, GCSE English Literature, Paper 2. We will then look at some non-fiction C19th texts – alongside Hans Christian Anderson’s ‘The Little Match Girl’ – to become familiar with C19th writing for both English Language and Literature. We will also be weaving GCSE poems and other GCSE skills throughout the schemes as part of our interleave curriculum.

Year 9 will be studying Malorie Blackman’s Noughts and Crosse,a seminal text that explores very real societal concerns. In the spirit of our Interleave Curriculum, we will explore themes such as segregation, bias, racism and supremacy through both the novel and through non-fiction texts. Students will re-visit key English skills, developing their understanding and providing them with a solid basis for their GCSE years. Reading, writing and spoken language skills will be addressed throughout this unit of work and some of the GCSE poems from the anthology will be introduced. In the last 3 weeks of the Spring term, Year 9 students will be introduced to moving image. Whilst we will continue to address key English skills, we will also take the opportunity to introduce skills useful for, and necessary in, Film Studies.

Year 9: During the first half of the summer term, Year 9 students will be introduced to Macbeth, the Shakespearean play that they will study at GCSE. We will be focusing on gaining an understanding of the plot before zooming in on a character study of Lady Macbeth. We will then interleave the curriculum to explore other disturbed characters in Literature, including some of the poems that students will need to be familiar with for Paper 2 of their GCSE English Literature exam. During the second half of the summer term, Year 9 students will be focusing on the form of the short story, examining ways that writers structure their writing to create specific effects whilst determining what a successful short story looks like. They will use the information gathered to enhance their analytical skills and to develop their own narrative writing. Finally, in July we will focus on a unit of work that introduces Victorian / Dickensian context and concepts in a scheme called ‘An Introduction to Dickens’. This is to pre-teach some of the information that students will need to successfully study the pre C19th prose text that they are required to cover during their GCSE years. As with all other units, we will revise and recap reading and writing skills.

Year 10

Year 11(Exam Board AQA) will be re-visiting Macbeth in preparation for their Literature exam in the Summer term and will be assessed on reading and writing skills. They will then revise the other texts studied for English Literature in preparation for their prelims in November (texts include: Poetry from the anthology, A Christmas Carol, An Inspector Calls and unseen poetry).

Year 11 will be re-visiting and revising English Language skills from both Paper 1 and Paper 2 in preparation for their Prelims in March. We will be reminding students about the questions they will face on each paper whilst building on the skills that they have already acquired. Exam timing and writing under timed conditions will also be re-visited to provide our students with the resilience in their writing necessary to be successful in their exams.

Year 11: Students will continue to have lessons dedicated to the revision of key texts / tasks relevant to the skillset of the class. When Year 11 goes on study leave, the English Department will continue to offer experienced teacher support when English lessons would have been timetabled for all Year 11s. This opportunity is open to all of our Year 11 students in the lead up to their English exams as we assist them in that final push to success.

Year 11

Year 11(Exam Board AQA) will be re-visiting Macbeth in preparation for their Literature exam in the Summer term and will be assessed on reading and writing skills. They will then revise the other texts studied for English Literature in preparation for their prelims in November (texts include: Poetry from the anthology, A Christmas Carol, An Inspector Calls and unseen poetry).

Year 11 will be re-visiting and revising English Language skills from both Paper 1 and Paper 2 in preparation for their Prelims in March. We will be reminding students about the questions they will face on each paper whilst building on the skills that they have already acquired. Exam timing and writing under timed conditions will also be re-visited to provide our students with the resilience in their writing necessary to be successful in their exams.

Year 11: Students will continue to have lessons dedicated to the revision of key texts / tasks relevant to the skillset of the class. When Year 11 goes on study leave, the English Department will continue to offer experienced teacher support when English lessons would have been timetabled for all Year 11s. This opportunity is open to all of our Year 11 students in the lead up to their English exams as we assist them in that final push to success.

Year 12

Year 12 will start their study of A Level English Literature with the non-examined element of the course. They will read: Arundhati Roy’s ‘The God of Small Things'; a selection of poems from Carol Ann Duffy's collection, 'The World's Wife' and 'Jerusalem', a play by Jez Butterworth. Following this, they will be expected to carry out independent research and reading to help them complete their two pieces of coursework.

Year 12 (Exam Board OCR) students will study the comparative and contextual component of the course, focusing on the dystopian genre and learning how to analyse unseen prose extracts. They will be encouraged to read a wide range of dystopian texts as well as to closely study two set texts necessary to complete the exam. We study Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and George Orwell’s Nineteen-Eighty Four. Part of the exam paper requires students to engage with, and analyse, an unseen passage, relating it to their contextual study: dystopian literature. With this in mind, we will be exploring various different extracts as well as investigating the key tropes and conventions of the dystopian genre.

Year 12: students will begin their study of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet', and will explore the significance of cultural and contextual influences on the writer and audience. Students will also study the Jacobean text, The Duchess of Malfi by John Webster and a collection of poems by Christina Rossetti. During their studies, students will be encouraged to make links between Webster’s tragedy and the themes, values and ideologies present in Rossetti’s poetry.

Year 13

Year 13 students will be continuing with their Comparative and Contextual component of the course, studying the dystopian genre and learning how to analyse unseen prose extracts. They will also be commencing their study of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet', and will explore the significance of cultural and contextual influences on the writer and audience.

Year 13 (Exam Board OCR) students will be continuing with their study of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet', and will explore the significance of cultural and contextual influences on the writer and audience. Students will also study the Jacobean text, The Duchess of Malfi by John Webster and a collection of poems by Christina Rossetti. During their studies, students will be encouraged to make links between Webster’s tragedy and the themes, values and ideologies present in Rossetti’s poetry.

Year 13: As with Year 11, our Year 13 students will also have the opportunity to continue to attend English lessons during the lead up to the exams. Key exam texts will be re-visited and we will recall the relevant skills and assessment objectives necessary to complete each section of the exam papers.

Page Updated 21/11/2019

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